WHAT IS TEASEL?

What is teasel?

Teasel is the common name for plants within the genus Dipsacus which contains approximately 15 species. Native to Europe, Asia and northern Africa, they are a group of tall herbaceous biennial plants easily identified by their prickly stem and leaves, and large, ovoid flowerheads. The dried flower heads are a popular choice in dried-flower arrangements, while the seeds are an important winter food resource for many seed eating birds, notably the European goldfinch.

Teasel dried flower heads
Arguable the most widely grown species is Dipsacus fullonum, from which is derived the notable cultivar 'Fuller's Teasel' - Dipsacus fullonum Sativus Group; syn. D. sativus. Fuller's Teasel was formerly used in the textile industry as a natural comb for cleaning, aligning and raising the nap on cotton and woolen fabrics. The common name teasel relates to the 'teasing of the fabric fibres'.

In their native habitat, teasels are commonly found in rough grassland, wood margins, thickets, hedgerows, roadsides and waste ground. They are particularly robust capable of thriving on a wide range of soil types. They are happy in full sun to partial shade and will perform best on light, well drained soils. However they will also tolerate heavy clay, chalky, acidic, and alkaline soils.

Due to the import of Fuller's Teasel for textile processing, and from crop seeds being contaminated with teasel seeds, they have become naturalised in many temperate climates. Such is its adaptability, teasel is now considered an invasive species in the United States, southern Africa, Australia and New Zealand.

For related articles click onto the following links:
HOW TO GROW TEASEL FROM SEED
WHAT IS TEASEL?

HOW TO GROW TEASEL FROM SEED

How to grow teasel from seed - http://ohioplants.org/

Teasel - Dipsacus fullonum, is a tall, striking, thistle-like plant with serrated leaves and large spiny flower heads. Native to Eurasia and North Africa it is a valuable source of nectar for bees and butterflies, as well as attracting many seed-eating birds to suburban gardens or wild flower meadows.The seeds are an important winter food resource for the European goldfinch. The spent blooms also make for attractive, dried, cut flowers.

Teasel seedlings - http://www.kingcounty.gov/
Using 7.5 cm pots or a modular seed tray, sow teasel seeds from February to June onto the surface of a good quality, free-draining, damp, seed compost such as John Innes 'Seed and Cutting'. Teasel seeds require the presence of sunlight to help initiate germination so only cover with a very fine sprinkling of compost or vermiculite. Place the tray or pots inside a heated or regular propagator at a temperature of 15-20C (59-68F). Alternatively seal inside a clear polythene bag and position in a warm bright windowsill, but one which does not receive direct sunlight as this can cause the compost to dry out. Germination can be irregular but you can expect the seedlings to emerge from 1-3 months.

Transplant modular seed tray seedlings once the roots have established into 7.5cm pots. Young plants will need to be gradually acclimatise to cooler conditions over a few weeks before planting out into their final position. However you will need to wait until all risk of late frost has passed before doing so.

Provide a position of sunlight for best results, however they will cope with shade. They are tolerant of most soil types from light, well-drained soils to heavy clay. Plant teasel seedlings 30-45cm apart.

For related articles click onto the following links:
HOW TO GROW MILK THISTLE - Silybum marianum
HOW TO GROW TEASEL FROM SEED
WHAT IS TEASEL?

JAPANESE KNOTWEED REMOVAL IN LITTLEHAMPTON

Japanese Knotweed removal in Littlehampton
WANT TO ERADICATE JAPANESE KNOTWEED FROM YOUR LITTLEHAMPTON PROPERTY? THEN CONTACT THE 'GARDENERS OF EADEN' AT gardenofeaden@gmail.com

Japanese knotweed is no laughing matter. It can both damage and devalue properties, although it is no longer illegal or notifiable to have Japanese Knotweed on your property. However you could be fined up to £5,000 or be sent to prison for up to 2 years if you allow contaminated soil or plant material from any waste you transfer to spread into the wild.

Unfortunately by law, if you find Japanese Knotweed on your land, it is your responsibility to eradicate it and prevent its further spread.

So what can you do?

Digging out Japanese Knotweed
Simply digging out Japanese knotweed is of course possible, but due to the depth that the roots can penetrate (up to 3m deep), regrowth usually occurs. Be aware that it takes just 0.8g of root for a new plant to grow again.

This method also creates problems with regards to disposal as Japanese knotweed is classed as 'controlled waste' under the Environmental Protection Act 1990. This requires a specific licence to transport Japanese knotweed waste, which can then only be taken to a landfill site licensed to accept Japanese knotweed.

Maybe we can help?

Chemical application on Japanese Knotweed
Arguably the most effective way to control and remove Japanese knotweed is to spray it with one of a number of commercial weedkillers - known as herbicides. Your local professional and award winning garden company 'The Gardeners of Eaden' are based in littlehampton and can provide a free assessment and quote regarding this.

All herbicides are applied  by a fully trained and licenced operatives with PA1 and PA6 certificates accredited by the City and Guilds National Proficiency Test Council. Proof of licence and certificates are available on request.

You can contact us at gardenofeaden@gmail.com or call us on 01903 715013

For related articles click onto the following links:
JAPANESE KNOTWEED
WHAT DOES JAPANESE KNOTWEED LOOK LIKE?
WHAT IS JAPANESE KNOTWEED

HOW TO GROW AUCUBA JAPONICA FROM CUTTINGS

HOW TO GROW AUCUBA JAPONICA FROM CUTTINGS

Aucuba japonica is a popular, hardy evergreen shrub native to Japan - hence the species name. Aucuba japonica are dioecious, meaning that they have separate male and female plants. Therefore you will need both sexes planted within proximity to produce berries on female type species or cultivars. They are easy to grow, and have proven to be tolerant of dry shade, atmospheric pollution and coastal winds.

Aucuba cutting - http://www.gardenfocused.co.uk/
While it is indeed possible to propagate Aucuba japonica from seed in September and October, it is acknowledged to be a particularly slow method of propagation. This is why growing Aucuba japonica from cuttings is the prefered technique. They will even root in a glass of water!

For best results, propagate Aucuba japonica from semi-ripe cuttings in August and September, or from fast-growing stem tips cut in spring.

Water the parent plant or plants the night before and aim to take your cuttings early in the morning to help keep your cutting material as turgid as possible. Unless you are striking your cuttings immediately, place your cutting material inside moist paper towel and place them in a plastic bag.

Using a sharp sterilized blade take cuttings 4-6 inches long, preferably with a heel, from healthy lateral shoots. Remove the leaves from the lower half of the stem and cut the remaining leaves in half. This will help to prevent your cutting from drying out before it has a chance to produce its roots.

Aucuba cutting - http://ckenb.blogspot.co.uk/
Using 3 inch pots, fill with a good quality compost such as John Innes 'Seed and Cutting' or produce your own by mixing equal parts by volume horticultural grade moss-peat and horticultural sand, Insert one cutting into each pot, but avoid having any leaves touching the compost. Rooting hormone is not required as Aucuba japonica can will readily produce roots under favourable conditions.

Gently water in and then place the pots of cuttings inside a cold frame shaded from the heat of the day . Alternatively, and if you have space, seal the pots inside a clear polythene bag and place in a cool, bright room, but one which does not receive direct sunlight. Once the roots begin to established they can be placed outside in a shaded coldframe.

The following April, the rooted cuttings can be potted on into larger pots or planted out into nursery rows and grown on for a further two years before setting out into their final position.

For related articles click onto the following links:
HOW TO GROW AUCUBA JAPONICA 'CROTONIFOLIA'
HOW TO GROW AUCUBA JAPONICA FROM CUTTINGS
HOW TO PROPAGATE CHOISYA TERNATA 'SUNDANCE'  FROM CUTTINGS
HOW TO TAKE CUTTINGS FROM BAY TREES

HOW TO GROW FUCHSIA 'TOM WEST'

Fuchsia 'Tom West'

Fuchsia 'Tom West' is a popular hardy, evergreen subshrub (though deciduous in cooler, northern European climates), notable for both its ornamental foliage and colourful blooms. It is a sport selected by the French breeder Meilliez in 1853 from the species 'Corallina' (although proven to be more tender), and also makes for an excellent choice for planting in patio pots and and containers.

Fuchsia 'Tom West'
Under favourable conditions you can expect Fuchsia 'Tom West'to grow to a height and spread of between 0.2-0.5 metres. It has an upright habit with vigorous, lax growth. The leaves are variegated cream and green, with cerise veins and stems. The small, single flowers have red tubes and sepals with purple corollas, and purple flowers appear from June to September.

Fuchsia 'Tom West' will grow happily in sun or part shade, and in a sheltered position. Plant into a light, well-drained soil, and fertilize monthly with a liquid soluble fertilizer, from spring through to July.

When growing as a container plant, use a good quality, well drained compost such as John Innes No.3. Pinch out the growing tips of young specimens, to promote bushier growth and more flowers.

Prune back to ground level in the spring, for a strong flush of new growth.

For related articles click onto the following links:
ARE FUCHSIA BERRIES EDIBLE?
HOW TO GROW FUCHSIA 'GENII'
HOW TO GROW FUCHSIA 'TOM WEST'

HOW TO GROW AUCUBA JAPONICA 'CROTONIFOLIA'

Aucuba japonica 'Crotonifolia' - http://www.aboutgardendesign.com/

Commonly known as the 'Spotted Laurel or 'Gold Dust Plant', Aucuba japonica 'Crotonifolia' is a popular hardy ornamental foliage plant and arguably the most attractive of all the selected cultivars. It is easy to grow and also suitable for use as a container plant. The type species is native to China, Korea, and Japan, and was introduced into England in 1783 by German botanist and nurseryman Johann Andreas Graeffer (1746– 1802).

Aucuba japonica 'Crotonifolia' - http://www.irgardencentre.com/
It has proven to be a particularly robust plant, capable of surviving the harshest garden conditions, notably dry shade, city pollution and salt-laden coastal winds.

Under favourable conditions, Aucuba japonica 'Crotonifolia' will reach a height and spread of between 1.5-2.5 metres.

The simple, evergreen leaves are glossy, leathery and approximately 15-20cm long. They are noted for their striking patterns of golden spots and blotches.

Aucuba japonica is dioecious, which means that there are separate male and female plants. An important point as the 'Crotonifolia' cultivar is male and therefore will not produce blooms or berries

It will perform best in full sun to semi-shade in a moist, well-drained soil. When grown as a container plant, use a good quality soil-based compost such as John Innes 'No 2'. To maintain condition provide a liquid soluble fertiliser every two to three weeks from May until September.

For related articles click onto the following links:
HOW TO GROW AUCUBA JAPONICA 'CROTONIFOLIA'
HOW TO GROW AUCUBA JAPONICA FROM CUTTINGS

HOW TO GROW FUCHSIA 'AUTUMNALE'

Fuchsia 'Autumnale'

Fuchsia austromontana 'Autumnale' is a half-hardy, evergreen subshrub and arguably the most attractive of all the ornamental foliage effect fuchsia cultivars. Its species name 'austromontana' means southern mountains, a reference to the Peruvian Andes from where the type species was first collected. The cultivar name is self-explanatory referring to the 'autumnal colours' of its foliage.

Fuchsia 'Autumnale' flowers
Originating from the cloud forests of Peru and Bolivia, Fuchsia 'Autumnale' will not be hardy enough to overwinter outside in the cooler climates of northern Europe. It will not tolerate frosts or freezing conditions, therefore bring under protection once temperatures begin to drop below 7 degrees. Alternatively, take cuttings and propagate new stock under protection for the following spring. Overwintered species just need to be kept moist. Do not allow the compost to dry out completely and avoid waterlogging.

It is noted for its green, coppery-orange foliage, which turns an increasingly vibrant dark red, coral pink and gold as the growing season progresses. If conditions are warm enough slender-tubed deep rose-red flowers with purple petals will be produced in the summer.

Fuchsia 'Autumnale' will require a sheltered position in a moist, but well-drained soil. It will perform best in full sun or a semi-shaded position. Apply a liquid soluble, balanced fertiliser once a month during the growing season. It has a prostrate habit which makes it a popular choice for ground-cover and hanging baskets.

Fuchsia austromontana 'Autumnale' received the Award of Garden merit (AGM) from the Royal Horticultural society in 2002.

For related articles click onto the following links:
ARE FUCHSIA BERRIES EDIBLE?
HOW TO GROW FUCHSIA MAGELLANICA 'Riccartonii'
HOW TO GROW FUCHSIA 'AUTUMNALE'
HOW TO GROW FUCHSIA 'TOM WEST'
MEXICAN ORANGE BLOSSOM - Choisya ternata

HOW TO GROW FUCHSIA MAGELLANICA 'Riccartonii'

Fuchsia magellanica 'Riccartonii'


Fuchsia magellanica 'Riccartonii' is a popular hardy evergreen sub-shrub (although considered deciduous in even the milder regions of the United Kingdom), noted for its ornamental foliage and narrow red and purple flowers. The type species is native to the temperate climates southern of Argentina and Chile, down to the Straits of Magellan, hence the species name.


Fuchsia magellanica 'Riccartonii'
It has an upright habit and produces small, ovate, dark-green leaves with a faint bronze sheen. Under favourable conditions it can grow to 10 feet (3.0 m) in height and width. In cooler European, frost-free climates, you are more likely to expect a height and width of between 4–5 feet (1.2–1.5 m).

The pendulous blooms appear profusely throughout the summer and autumn. They are comparatively small, with crimson tube and sepals, and violet-purple petals.


Grow Fuchsia magellanica 'Riccartonii' in a fertile, moist but well-drained soil. It will perform best when exposed to full morning sun, but keep partially-shaded during the hottest part of the day. In late winter, prune plants back to 12 to 18 inches in order to encourage produce fresh foliage in the spring. In exposed conditions or regions which experience prolonged freezing conditions, planted deeply and provide a dry mulch ( such as gravel or bark chips) over the winter.

Fuchsia magellanica 'Riccartonii' received the Award of Garden Merit (AGM) from the Royal Horticultural Society in 1993.

For related articles click onto the following links:
ARE FUCHSIA BERRIES EDIBLE?
HOW TO GROW FUCHSIA 'AUTUMNALE'
HOW TO GROW FUCHSIA MAGELLANICA 'Riccartonii'
HOW TO GROW FUCHSIA 'TOM WEST'